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.222 special, "rem umc 222 spl" h/s, produced 1954 to 1956, prototype/experimental cartridge that lead to the 5.56 nato and .223 remington. one cartridge not a box.
.222 Special, “REM-UMC 222 SPL” H/S, produced 1954 to 1956, prototype/experimental cartridge that lead to the 5.56 NATO and .223 Remington. One Cartridge not a Box. Sale $5.00 off!

$9.75

$9.75

In stock

1206191890

.222 Special, “REM-UMC 222 SPL” H/S, produced 1954 to 1956, prototype/experimental cartridge that lead to the 5.56 NATO and .223 Remington. One Cartridge not a Box. Sale $5.00 off!

$9.75

“1954/56 Production!”, Mint! Very Nice *Patina*! NO Dents! No Scratches, No corrosion! No Junk!
One Cartridge, not a box, the picture of the box is for reference only.
For more Detailed Information, please see below.

For more versions of other prototype/experimental cartridges, please click here: LINK!
For more versions of 5.56 NATO and .223 Remington cartridges, please click here: LINK!

Please click on the picture for more detail.

In stock

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Description

The 1954 experimental cartridge leading to the 5.56x45mm NATO or 5.56 NATO*.

“1954 Production!”,  NEVER produced commercially, Near Mint! Very Nice *Patina, minor spots if any, NO Dents! No Scratches, No corrosion! Great condition for 70+ Years old.

One Cartridge, not a box: .222 Special produced by Remington Arm Company, (under specifications which were developed by Armalite) using (Then New) Remington brass cases with “REM-UMC 223 SPL” Head-Stamp and loaded using Sierra 55 grain FMJ bullets, nickel primers and a IMR4475 powder, made by Dupont.
Remington produced the .222 Special cartridges for testing under the specifications which were developed by Armalite (the “A” in AR-15 or Armalite Rifle) and the early .222 Special cartridges were loaded using Sierra 55 grain FMJ bullets, nickel primers and a IMR4475 powder made by Dupont.
*Patina: Most collectors like Patina (nice word for tranish) Due to age some Patina started, or if you want polish it with brass polish.

History of the the prototype/experimental cartridges that lead to the 5.56 NATO and later the commercial .223 Remington:
After World War II and the decommissioning of the .30-06 in favor of the 7.62 NATO (308 Winchester) for use in the M14 firearm (which was unsatisfactory) the military decided that another smaller caliber was needed for our USA military as well as all NATO forces.
Work began in the early- to mid-1950’s and there were many prototype/experimental calibers leading to the 1957 trails and introduction of the 5.56 NATO and later the 223 Remington cartridge (.223 Remington has thinner wall case and is rated for less pressure then the 5.56 NATO).
Some of the experimental cartridges were called .222 Remington Magnum (aka .224 Springfield), .224 Winchester E1 (43mm Case length) and *E2 (45mm Case Length) with other E versions in the .224 Winchester and the .222 Special (Colonel Stoner’s Design with a case length or 45mm) which won the trails and became the 5.56 NATO and later the .223 Remington .

For more versions of other prototype/experimental cartridges, please click here: LINK!

For more versions of 5.56 NATO and .223 Remington cartridges, please click here: LINK!

History of the .223 Remington and *5.56 NATO* cartridge:
The .223 Remington was introduced in 1957 as an experimental cartridge for the M4 (AR-15) rifle, as the United States forces was looking to replace the 7.62x51mm NATO* (308 Winchester) with a lighter recoil cartridge with less range for closer combat situations.
In 1964 it was adopted by the United Stated Army as the 5.6x45mm Ball cartridge: M193.
Shortly after the United States Army adopted the cartridge, and Remington introduced the 223 Remington to the general public for the sporting and hunting industry.
In 1977, NATO* countries signed an agreement to select the *5.56x45mm (5.6 NATO) cartridge to replace the 7.62x51mm or 7.62 NATO* cartridge; however, due to the devastating wound damage of the 55 grain M193, it was decided to use the Belgian 62 grain SS109 projectile, which was soon standardized as the official NATO* cartridge.
The .223 Remington and 5.56x45mm NATO* are not actually identical, although, the outside case dimensions are approximately the same, the 5.56x45mm (5.56 NATO) has a thicker walled case and is usually loaded to higher pressures.
Because of the higher 5.56x45mm (5.56 NATO) pressures, it is best not to use the 5.56x45mm (5.56 NATO) cartridge in a rifle chambered for the lower pressure .223 Remington.
*NATO is an acronym for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, an alliance of app. 30 countries, started after World War II, which includes the United States, most European Union countries, Canada,  Turkey and shortly at this writing Finland and Sweden.
* 5.56 in the 5.56 NATO refers to the diameter of the projectile 5.6mm or 22 caliber (.224″)
*45mm in 5.56x45mm refer to the case length (1.75″).

Additional information

Weight 0.10 lbs
Manufacturer

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